Human Nature

/* Working Papers of Patrick Lee Cheatham - under Content Development */

Classic liberty theory puts forth an opinion of human nature with the default or generic human behavior being neither noble nor vile, but rather with human nature falling more comfortably in between, in the main of population, and with relatively few excursions into truly ugly behavior socially toward others.

This view sees human nature as being overall and on average of sound and reasonable behavior. The view is in no need of casting positive light by way of promoting any grand nobility on human nature, in the raw. This would be a disservice to who we are broadly, and we don’t need more backwards condemnation that we stand in need of such a reputation fix at the start of matters.

The view also does not demote human nature to any necessarily villainous criminal personality, in the raw, either. This would be another disservice to who we humans are, broadly.

Humans are real. Humans at times have admirable strengths and awkward weaknesses. Humans at times exhibit infectious kindness, and at times exhibit droll divested indifference. It is a matter unique to each particular situation and to each individual person’s tastes as to which sort of behavior would have actually been preferred during some social interaction, as over-compensation either way can only make things more awkward.